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20130124
20130201
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CSPAN 4
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
counterinsurgency in the korean peninsula, very different environment, so we want to make sure we get the standards right, that we don't overengineer that either, that they are fair. and then we want to allow individuals to compete for this position. >> physical standards? >> not just physical standards. the standards we have for these military occupations generally could include everything from mental standards to physical standards. the physical standards tend to be the ones people focus on. we figured out privacy right from the start. by the way, desert storm, desert shield 1991, we did live in that kind of environment where we were essentially somewhat nomadic in saudi arabia eventually iraq we figured out privacy. >> the fact is that was one of the concerns at the time, but the fact is that they have rejiggered to be able to adapt to that kind of situation. women are fighter pilots now. so air force, navy has lived in that direction. the marines and the army obviously you're going to live in the same direction. there will have to be some adjustments in some situations, but again, based on the
-lingual time. there are so many parts of the culture where spanish is a huge part of the environment. the speaking english, saying, yes we should do this. this is a tip of the hat to the conservatives. then we change the standards we have out there from state to state. some states have adopted a multi-language requirements for some tests and different aspects of government. do we change all of that? and go right back to english? what does that say to the -- to the latino-speaking community that has spent so much time trying to foster their own language as it were. >> then, after all of that, they guild to the back of the line, for citizenship. michael, thanks for trying to simplify a very complicate the process. have a great day. >> thanks. >> weather alert for you now. an outbreak of dangerous weather. here it is, folks. take a look at the screen, across the midwest, tormaido watches in effect. we will get updates from janet coming up. we'll be right back. [ male announcer ] what are happy kids made of? bikes and balloons, wholesome noodles on spoons. a kite, a breeze, a dunk of gri
these decisions have on the environment that the u.s. is in. for most of history, we have maintained a strong military, not so that we can fight, but so that we can not fight. the other. that time made that is important -- the other point that tom made is to understand what is involved in military operations. there is a piece on the web that explains exactly what it is we can do with the troops we have at the president makes critical decisions about afghanistan. it is not just about bureaucrats in d.c.. fighting a war is a big logistical exercise. do you does want to talk about that and several surrounding decisions? >> we have become very accustomed to throwing around numbers of troops, and people have gotten way too comfortable with pulling numbers out of the air and discussing them as though they were serious. the effect of that is that very few americans actually understand that there is a method for figuring out how many troops are actually needed to accomplish something. when the recommendation comes from a military commander, this cannot just, as this white house seems to think, the co
who are mobile and work and a global environment and a large market. it is for the non college-bound people who used to go into factory jobs, blue-collar jobs that have been disappearing because of global labor competition. this brings back something on both sides. >> i talked to young people lot. mentoring them was real important. our industry changed a lot. it used to be joe roughneck out there on the raid. -- rig. today it is so highly technical. we see so many people out there. use the computers up on our raised floor. -- use the computers up on our -- you see computers up on our rig floor. there are guys following what we are doing, making real time decisions. it is a different world today than it was before. an incredibly dirty business. -- nerdy business. it has become that. >> we had an odd editorial meeting about two years ago in which someone came in and was talking to us about the need for investments in wind power and also in mandating the use of gas. multiple choice question for you. is he a fool, or a villain? [laughter] >> i think he learned a lesson or two with
and regulations with very little impact on the global climate. in this tight budget environment with so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing. i don't know if you have specific thoughts. >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts on it more than we have time now. and i'm not going to abuse that privilege. but i will say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you are expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. you want to do business and do it well in america, we got to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. i can tell you, massachusetts, fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy efficiency companies. and they're growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. t
more. you want to dress in layers and dress properly for the environment. >> is there a big difference in terms of elderly and young people in ways that tech really get sick and -- they can really get sick and suffer illness? >> definitely. older people have a decreased cold tolerance. they don't sense the cold as quickly as younger people do. plus they have other health concerns as well that affect their ability to be warm and to remain warm in cold climates. they also take a lot of medications which can decrease their ability to stay warm, so they're definitely a high risk category as well as infants. infants really can't tell you when they're cold, and they have a decreased ability to tolerate cold, cold temperatures, so it's important to check on both of those extremes. >> i know you brought some props in to show us what we can do to protect ourselves. >> i did. grandma already taught us this, but maintaining a good diet and staying healthy includes lots of fruits and vegetables. you need to drink a lot of water as well, and people say, oh, why do i need to drink water? your skin g
like he does will have to be more comfortable with that sport as it pushes toward a safer environment with less violence. we will witness what it look like a week from now. it is one topic the president was comfortable weighing in on. >> a couple of new insights from the president there. white house correspondent peter alexander, thank you so much. >>> new today, renewed fights over how to deal with the federal budget. dick durbin is defending what president obama said in his inauguration speech. >> what i heard the president say was programs like social security, medicare and medicaid, critically important for our future and we need to have a bipartisan commitment to make them work. bob and i have been in a lot of meetings talks about deficit reductions. i think we need reform in these programs that means they will live on to serve future generations. that's the message i took from the president. >> former republican vice presidential nominee paul ryan said the gop needs to recommend at this times approach with voters looking forward. >> we have to expand our appeal. we had to expan
of the political parties. i worry about the environment and all kinds of things, but the reality -- reliability of the u.s. debt, not at all. i am worried about the social and political stability of the world. a large part of europe that is depressioneriencing great levels of unemployment. and how long can we sustain u stable democratic system when 60 percent of the young people are out of work? that is the concern in europe right now. host: the twitter question touches on this. also, are there any models in europe that are succeeding? guest: if you look at sweden has handled this very well. the excess of welfare state is the problem. the biggest welfare state in the world and has driven through the crisis beautifully. my favorite, the little economy that could, iceland. they were supposed to turn into a smoking whole, but they broke their rules. they did not bail out the bankers. they were willing to let the currency to value. they were willing to let there be controls. it has a lower and a plumber rate than we do right now. -- unemployment rate than we do right now. britain is interesting. wh
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)